Posts Tagged ‘toyota recall’

Toyota Announces Plan to Address Recalled Accelerator Pedals in Compliance with Lemon Law

After major recall events, Toyota promises customers a fix for accelerator pedal safety issues.

Online PR News – 03-February-2010 – Pittsburg, PA — Toyota announces they will begin fixing accelerator pedal safety issues this week after the voluntary recall of 2.3 million vehicles. The proposed solution reinforces the pedal assembly to reduce friction that Toyota says may cause the pedal to stick. Toyota has indicated that they will ship parts to dealers and begin dealer training immediately.

“We have developed a comprehensive plan to fix the sticking pedal situation in recalled Toyota vehicles,” said Jim Lentz, President of Toyota Motor Sales, USA. “We know what’s causing the sticking accelerator pedals…We also know it is most important to fix this problem in the cars on the road.”

Toyota promises customers that dealers will be open extended hours to handle the repairs. Owners of recalled vehicles can expect notifications explaining how to contact dealers for servicing. Toyota and Pontiac vehicles included in the recall are 2009-2010 RAV4, 2009-2010 Corolla, 2009-2010 Matrix, 2005-2010 Avalon, 2007-2010 Camry, 2010 Highlander, 2007-2010 Tundra, 2008-2010 Sequoia, 2009-2010 Vibe. Camry, RAV 4, Corolla and Highlander vehicles with VINs that begin with ‘J’ are not affected.

Owners who have concerns about their vehicle or its repair should keep documentation of repair orders, dealer conversations and any technical service bulletins. It is important to keep records of repair work including dates and times of all dealer or technician conversations and the time the vehicle was out of service.

The National Highway Safety Administration advises owners to pay attention how their accelerator pedals are working. If the accelerator becomes harder to depress or slower to return than normal, it may be a precursor to a safety issue. The NTSA says, “These vehicles should be parked and a dealer immediately notified. Should a pedal become stuck in a partially depressed condition while driving, owners should put their car in neutral, bring it to a stop and call their dealer.”

Owners who have experienced injury or loss of use of their vehicle from a sticking accelerator pedal should contact a lemon law professional in their state to see what remedies are available. Lemon laws exist to help resolve disputes between customers and manufacturers in the repair of defects in new motor vehicles.

“Every owner of one of the Toyota vehicles covered by the recall should make an appointment to get their accelerator pedal reinforced as soon as possible. Anyone who has experienced injury or loss of use of a vehicle due to a sticking accelerator pedal safety defect should contact a qualified attorney who is experienced handling lemon law cases to determine if additional remedies are available,” recommends lemon law attorney David Gorberg. “Lemon laws vary greatly. New Jersey Lemon Law stipulates that just a single incident involving driving safety can qualify a consumer for compensation, while other state laws, like Pennsylvania’s lemon law, may allow a dealer up to 3 attempts before a consumer is entitled to additional compensation.”

The Lemon Law Attorneys at David J. Gorberg & Associates have arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of lemon law claims throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania, recovering millions of dollars for their clients. Find more information at www.mylemon.com or call 1-800-MyLemon.

Toyota Issues 2nd Major Recall in Compliance with Lemon Law

In a second, major recall event, Toyota announced its voluntary safety recall to address sticking accelerator pedals. This recall affects over 2 million vehicles of the following models: 2009-2010 RAV4, 2009-2010 Corolla, 2009-2010 Matrix, 2005-2010 Avalon, 2007-2010 Camry, 2010 Highlander, 2007-2010 Tundra, and 2008-2010 Sequoia. Owners of these vehicles can expect notifications explaining how to contact their dealer for recall servicing.

The issue of sticking accelerator pedals has been under investigation and a matter of concern since reports of sticking accelerator pedals have been linked to high-speed crashes and fatalities.

‘In recent months, Toyota has investigated isolated reports of sticking accelerator pedal mechanisms in certain vehicles without the presence of floor mats,” said TMS Group Vice President Irv Miller. “Our investigation indicates that there is a possibility that certain accelerator pedal mechanisms may, in rare instances, mechanically stick in a partially depressed position or return slowly to the idle position. Consistent with our commitment to the safety of our cars and our customers, we have initiated this voluntary recall action.’

Toyota reports that the rare condition is attributed to worn pedal mechanisms that can cause the pedal to be slow to return to its normal position or even stuck in a partially depressed position.

Toyota advises owners who experience problems with a sticking accelerator pedal to apply firm, steady pressure without any pumping of the brakes and to park in the nearest safe location, turn the engine off, and contact a Toyota dealer for assistance. The investigation into unintended acceleration is ongoing to identify any other common causes that might be associated with the issue.

Owners who have experienced injury or the loss of use of their vehicle from a sticking accelerator pedal should contact a lemon law professional in their state to see what remedies are available.

“Anyone who has experienced injury or loss of vehicle use due to a sticking accelerator pedal vehicles safety defect should contact a qualified attorney who is experienced handling lemon law cases.” recommends lemon law attorney David Gorberg. “Lemon laws can vary greatly from state to state. New Jersey lemon law stipulates that just a single incident can qualify a vehicle as a lemon when it involves a potential serious safety issue. Other state laws, like Pennsylvania lemon law, may allow a dealer up to 3 attempts to repair the problem before a vehicle is designated a lemon.”

Can Toyota Recall Stave Off Future Lemon Law Claims?

Toyota has taken proactive measures to address safety concerns with a poor combination of floor mats and pedal position causing problems with braking and acceleration. The voluntary recall has been issued by the manufacturer across many models, including the Prius, Camry, Avalon, Tacoma, and Tundra. Reports of sudden acceleration possibly resulting from complications of floor mat jamming have prompted Toyota to issue its most widespread recall ever. A Tennessee family filed a $10 million lawsuit against Toyota from the death of Dustin Ricardo after his 2007 Toyota Camry crashed into a tree from sudden unexpected acceleration. Toyota has issued a floor mat advisory describing the issue.

The Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has the authority to force recalls of safety-related defects, but in this case, Toyota has taken the initiative to issue the recalls voluntarily. Differences between Toyota’s and NHTSA perspective on the cause of the defect remain in dispute. Lemon law requires manufacturers to offer a replacement vehicle or refund for defects that significantly impair use, value, or safety of a vehicle. Lemon law claims are constrained by mileage and time limits that differ from state to state. New Jersey’s lemon law allows cars to be classified as lemons after a single failure of a critical safety function such as steering or braking. Pennsylvania’s lemon law requires three repair attempts.

Toyota dealers are still waiting for the complete list of vehicles and VIN numbers affected by the recall and are expecting this information within the next week. Toyota is responsible for notifying dealerships and owners of eligible vehicles and footing the bill for repairs. Owners who have had defects repaired already may qualify for reimbursement.

Toyota needs to address these safety concerns as swiftly and comprehensively as possible. These types of safety defects warrant compensation under the lemon law, and it’s in the best interest of Toyota’s ongoing relationship with their customers to address these issues head on. Any owners of vehicles on Toyota’s recall list should schedule repairs at their earliest convenience.

For owners of vehicles who have already suffered an accident or a loss of use of their vehicle due to a safety defect, recourse may be available under state lemon law guidelines.

Lemon laws can vary greatly from state to state. Anyone affected by a vehicle safety defect should contact a qualified attorney who is experienced handling lemon law cases within the same state that the owner resides in. Safety issues with any vehicle need to be taken seriously. Many lemon law firms offer free lemon law case evaluations and get paid directly from the manufacturer so there is no cost to the vehicle owner.