David J. Gorberg the Lemon Law Attorney Nominated for Cambridge Who’s Who Directory

David J. Gorberg was recently nominated for inclusion in Cambridge Who’s Who directory. Cambridge Who’s Who is an online compilation of biographies of executives, professionals and entrepreneurs in nearly every industry and career field. The profiles list members’ expertise, achievements, affiliations and education. From healthcare to law, engineering to finance, manufacturing to education, nearly every major profession is represented by 400,000 active executive, professional and entrepreneur members. The membership base is international, with the majority of members in the United States, Canada, Australia and England.

David is one of the nation’s most respected lemon law attorneys. He was the only lemon law attorney in the state of Pennsylvania to be named to the Top 100 Lawyers list for 2004, 2005, and 2007, as appeared in Philadelphia Magazine. In addition to the Top 100 Lawyer List, Mr. Gorberg has been named a 2004-2009 Pennsylvania Super Lawyer. He is the founding attorney of the lemon law firm David J. Gorberg & Associates, P.C. and concentrates his practice in the field of Lemon Law and Breach of Warranty. The firm maintains offices in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Mt. Laurel, New Jersey.

Mr. Gorberg graduated from University of Wisconsin – Madison in 1985 earning a Bachelor of Letters Degree in History, and thereafter attended the Southwestern School of Law where he graduated in 1988 with a Juris Doctor Degree . He is an attorney in good standing and has been admitted to practice in Pennsylvania and New York. He is a member of the Pennsylvania Trial Lawyers Association, Philadelphia Trial Lawyers Association and Philadelphia Bar Association. Mr. Gorberg has been recognized nationally in the field of lemon law, and consumer protection.

In addition to the Top 100 Super Lawyer honor, Mr. Gorberg was recently honored by The Law Office Computing Magazine as having one of the best law firm websites in the nation. Mr. Gorberg runs David J. Gorberg & Associates, P.C., one of the most successful, and recognized lemon law firms in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh. Their lemon law attorneys have represented thousands of clients throughout the entire state of Pennsylvania and New Jersey. It maintains offices in Ardmore, PA (Philadelphia), Pittsburgh and Mt. Laurel, NJ. The firm has been recognized nationally and locally as one of the leaders in the field of lemon law, and has recovered millions of dollars in settlements for its many clients.

Honda Announces Recall of 400,000 Vehicles In Compliance with Lemon Law

Honda recalls of nearly 400,000 Odyssey minivans and Element small truck from 2007-2008 will go into effect by the end of April 2010, in compliance with lemon law safety issues. Over time, brake pedals can feel “soft” and need to be pressed increasingly closer to the floor in order to completely stop vehicles.

To qualify under the New Jersey Lemon Law, the vehicle defect must substantially impair the use, value or safety of the vehicle – the braking system of a vehicle is included in this definition. As a result, Honda will recall vehicles in order to modify the Vehicle Stability Assist (VSA) modulator. This device powers the electronic stability control system, which selectively brakes each of the wheels to keep the vehicles upright during an emergency situation.

The VSA’s of affected vehicles were assembled with a small amount of air intrusion. Over a period of months or years, more air can accumulate and result in lowered brake pedals.

After being notified of the recall in mid-March, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported three crashes with minor injuries and no casualties due to the brake pedal issue, according to Chris Martin, Honda spokesman.

After receiving a number of customer complaints, Honda will be issuing notifications to customers with affected vehicles starting April 19. Honda owners should wait to get a letter from the company before scheduling repairs due to the unavailability of the necessary parts.

Honda drivers who suspect they have lost braking power should have their dealer check the brakes sooner, Martin said. The dealer can “bleed” air bubbles out of the hydraulic lines, which should fix the problem until the parts arrive, he said.

“Every owner of affected Honda vehicle should make an appointment to get their brake systems reinforced as soon as possible. Anyone who has experienced injury or loss of use of a vehicle due to a brake pedal safety defect should contact a qualified attorney with experience in handling lemon law cases to determine if additional steps need to be taken,” recommends lemon law attorney David Gorberg.

If you own or lease a Honda vehicle and have been experiencing braking system problems, be sure to call us for more information about your Pennsylvania Lemon Law and New Jersey Lemon Law rights at 1-800-MY-LEMON (1-800-695-3666).

The Lemon Law Attorneys at David J. Gorberg & Associates have arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of lemon law claims throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania, recovering millions of dollars for their clients. Find more information at www.mylemon.com or call 1-800-MyLemon.

David J. Gorberg & Associates, The Lemon Law Attorneys, has arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of lemon law claims to date, throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania, recovering millions of dollars for it’s clients. 1-800 MY LEMON (1-800-695-3666) or www.mylemon.com.

Lemon Law, Lemmon Law, Leamon Law & Even Lemom Law – Different Spellings for the Same Legal Protection

Here at 1-800-MY-LEMON we find many people visiting our lemon law website using a variety of different spellings for ‘lemon law’. While the searches vary from the more understandable, like lemmon law, to the downright strange, leamon law or lemaon law, the lemon law information and consumer protection that people are looking for doesn’t vary.
Here at 1-800-MY-LEMON, we take great pride in helping residents of Pennsylvania and New Jersey understand their rights when it comes to their state’s lemon laws. 

Wisconsin Court Orders Mercedes-Benz to Pay Large Fines Due to Lemon Law Statutes

A judge has ordered Mercedes-Benz USA LLC to pay $482,000 in damages and legal fees to a Wisconsin customer who was sold a defective car and not given a refund on time. The conflict had been ongoing for four years and remains one of the largest cases involving a single car under a state lemon law.

Car owner Marco Marquez, a 37-year-old businessman from Waukesha, purchased the E 320 for $56,000 from a Milwaukee dealership in 2005. Almost immediately, the car often would not start, and despite replacing the battery, the problem continued. After several repair attempts, the dealership said the problem could not be fixed.

Mercedes-Benz spokeswoman Donna Boland said the company, a unit of the German car maker Daimler AG, is disappointed the judge overturned an earlier verdict in favor of the company. On Friday, the company’s lawyer asked the court to put the judgment on hold pending an appeal.

Marquez hired a lawyer who sent the company a refund demand in October 2005. The company agreed to the refund, but failed to provide one within 30 days. On the 31st day, Marquez’s lemon lawyer filed the lawsuit on behalf of Marquez seeking double damages and attorneys’ fees.

Mercedes-Benz acknowledged the car was defective, but accused Marquez of acting in bad faith.The company says an employee asked Marquez for information about his auto loan on the 30th day so the refund could be granted, but Marquez failed to follow through. Marquez’s lawyer claims Mercedes-Benz had the information it needed for the refund but was stalling.

A judge ruled in Marquez’s favor in 2007, awarding $202,000 in damages and legal fees. But an appeals court in 2008 overturned that decision and ordered additional proceedings, saying a jury should decide whether Marquez intentionally prevented the company from giving the refund on time.

A jury sided with the company last year, agreeing Marquez acted in bad faith. But in a rare move, Waukesha County Circuit Judge Michael Bohren overturned the verdict, saying it was not backed up by evidence. He ruled in Marquez’s favor, citing a clear “lack of urgency” by Mercedes-Benz to refund his money.

In the meantime, Marquez has continued to drive the vehicle in question, which now has 56,000 miles. He said it was back in the shop for repairs twice last year but has been drivable.

If you find yourself in a similar situation with a lemon car, call us for more information about your Pennsylvania Lemon Law and New Jersey Lemon Law rights at 1-800-MY-LEMON (1-800-695-3666).

The Lemon Law Attorneys at David J. Gorberg & Associates have arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of lemon law claims throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania, recovering millions of dollars for their clients. Find more information at www.mylemon.com or call 1-800-MyLemon.

Source: The Associated Press

Avoid Buying A Lemon Car & Know Your Lemon Law Rights

Calling all cautious consumers – some proactive methods practiced while seeking and before purchasing a car can save buyers the hassle of finding out they own lemon cars after the fact.

  • Research manufacturers and dealer websites to find the specifications and models of desired cars. Check consumer safety and protection agencies, like the Center for Auto Safety (CAS). Fortunately, all motor vehicles used for primarily personal use are covered under the Pennsylvania and New Jersey Lemon Law.
  • After selecting a model and make, search for the right dealer with a good profile. This is a vital step in avoiding buying a lemon car.
  • If buying a used car, don’t purchase it without a thorough check by the mechanic first. It may be worth spending money on the car before buying it to avoid a much greater amount on fixing it up after it is purchased.
  • Check the financing terms being offered by the dealer and compare them with other financing companies.
  • When buying a used car, always make sure that the vehicle is covered by a road worthiness certificate or a warranty.

Knowing your lemon rights can significantly help you track the information needed if you do purchase a lemon car. MyLemon.com’s lemon law attorneys recommend that all vehicle owners:

  • Maintain a Complete Vehicle Record – Documenting your various attempts at fixing a particular defect is extremely important for your lemon law case. Never leave the dealer or manufacturer without a detailed statement of what was done to the vehicle, as well as any charges that may have been included.
  • Inquire about TSBs – When an automobile manufacturer discovers a defect or repair for a certain model of automobile, they send instructions to alert dealerships using what is known as TSBs. Make sure that the dealer representative who you are dealing with writes down your TSB request on the repair order.
  • Be Assertive – If you are having problems getting the problem properly fixed, ask to speak with the manager or a higher up to address your problem and concerns.
  • Be Wary of Certain Statements – The dealership may have something to gain by accusing the driver or owner of the vehicle of being responsible for the defect. This is often done because the dealership is unable to fix the problem.

If you think you have purchased a lemon car, check the New Jersey or Pennsylvania lemon law, and consult a lemon law attorney for your next steps.

The Lemon Law Attorneys at David J. Gorberg & Associates have arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of lemon law claims throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania, recovering millions of dollars for their clients. Find more information at www.mylemon.com or call 1-800-MyLemon.

Toyota Sudden Acceleration – Lemon Law Rights

1-800-MY-LEMON, The Lemon Law Lawyers, have received many phone calls from Toyota owners requesting lemon law information about the sudden acceleration problem and recalls of the floor mats as well as gas pedal.

Toyota first acknowledged that there was a problem with its vehicles in September of 2009 when it warned its customers to remove the floor mats from certain models. They claimed that the floor mats may have been trapping the accelerator in the depressed position. Finally acknowledging that there was a defect in its vehicles, Toyota recalled 3.8 million vehicles in October of 2009 and millions more in November of 2009. On January 21, 2010, Toyota announced a recall of another 2.3 million vehicles, this time claiming that the vehicles had a potentially defective accelerator. Days later, Toyota stopped the production and sales for several models with gas pedal problems.

The following Toyota vehicles are affected by the most recent accelerator pedal recall:

• 2009-2010 RAV4;
• 2009-2010 Corolla;
• 2009-2010 Matrix;
• 2005-2010 Avalon;
• 2007-2010 Camry;
• 2010 Highlander;
• 2007-2010 Tundra;
• 2008-2010 Sequoia,

Clearly, there is an overlap with the recall of the vehicles with floor mat problems recognized in the fall of 2009 and that of the accelerator defect in 2010. It is unknown whether Toyota’s recall for the floor mat problem was in fact a result of faulty analysis; that the real problem was the defective accelerator. In any event, Toyota has been aware of sudden acceleration problems with their vehicles for years. If you are driving a Toyota and have experienced acceleration problems, please call us for more information about your Pennsylvania Lemon Law and New Jersey Lemon Law rights at 1-800-MY-LEMON
(1-800-695-3666).

Emergency Vehicles Added Under the New Jersey Lemon Law

February 19, 2010 – A new bill passed to cover emergency vehicles under the New Jersey lemon law protection, including ambulances, fire trucks, police cars and other vehicles. The changes outline conditions for company reimbursement or replacements of emergency vehicles.

It all started when Doug Fenichel, APR, a volunteer emergency medical technician with Flanders (NJ) Fire Company and Rescue Squad, found himself treating a cardiac patient in the back of an ambulance that had broken down.

After a closer look, he discovered that the ambulance had a number of engine problems, and the vehicle had been to Ford dealers multiple times for the same engine problem.

Fenichel notified the 24th District legislators, and a bill was unanimously passed in December 2009.

The stipulations include:

  • Manufacturers of new vehicles are required to correct defects that are originally covered under the manufacturer’s warranty.
  • It applies to new vehicles that develop repeated defects or unusable periods during either the first two years or 18,000 miles.
  • A new vehicle is considered a lemon if it has one or more defects that continue to exist after three attempts at repairs, or after the vehicle has been out of service for a total of 20 cumulative calendar days.

“It is a significant matter of public safety to include emergency vehicles under lemon law protection,” says lemon law attorney David Gorberg. “Taxpayers should benefit greatly from the expansion of the current lemon law, while emergency vehicle manufacturers should be held accountable for their product.”

The Lemon Law Attorneys at David J. Gorberg & Associates have arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of lemon law claims throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania, recovering millions of dollars for their clients. More information at www.mylemon.com or by calling 1-800-MyLemon.

As Toyota Announces Fix to Comply with Lemon Laws, LaHood Advises “Stop Driving”

Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood tells Toyota owners to bring their cars to a dealer.

Online PR News – 11-February-2010 – Cherry Hill, NJ – Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said in Congressional testimony last week that owners of recalled vehicles should ‘stop driving it, take it to a Toyota dealer because they believe they have a fix for it.’ LaHood later retracted his statement and rephrased the recommendation to Toyota owners to bring their cars to their dealership for assistance. By that time, Toyota stock had fallen 5%.

After recalling 2.30 million vehicles, Toyota announced Monday that they are shipping parts to dealers and beginning training to repair sticky accelerator pedals, which may lead to uncontrolled acceleration events in compliance with lemon laws. The proposed solution reinforces the pedal assembly to reduce friction that Toyota says may cause the pedal to stick.

Owners of recalled vehicles can expect notifications explaining how to contact dealers for servicing. Toyota promises customers that dealers will be open extended hours to handle the repairs. Toyota and Pontiac vehicles included in the recall are 2009-2010 RAV4, 2009-2010 Corolla, 2009-2010 Matrix, 2005-2010 Avalon, 2007-2010 Camry, 2010 Highlander, 2007-2010 Tundra, 2008-2010 Sequoia, 2009-2010 Vibe. Camry, RAV 4, Corolla and Highlander vehicles with VINs that begin with ‘J’ are not affected.

Owners who have concerns about their vehicle or its repair should keep documentation of repair orders, dealer conversations and any technical service bulletins. It is important to keep records of repair work including dates and times of all dealer or technician conversations. Owners who are unable to drive their cars should document the dates and times the vehicle was out of service.

Anyone who has experienced injury or loss of use of their vehicle from a sticking accelerator pedal should contact a lemon law professional in their state to see what remedies are available. Lemon laws exist to help resolve disputes between customers and manufacturers in the repair of defects in new motor vehicles.

“Anyone who has experienced injury or loss of use of a vehicle due to a sticking accelerator pedal safety defect should contact a qualified attorney who is experienced handling lemon law cases,” recommends lemon law attorney David Gorberg. “Lemon laws can vary greatly from state to state. New Jersey lemon law allows for time out of service claims. An experienced lemon law attorney can help you with the laws in your state.”

The Lemon Law Attorneys at David J. Gorberg & Associates have arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of Pennsylvania and New Jersey lemon law claims, recovering millions of dollars for their clients. Find more information at www.mylemon.com or call 1-800-MyLemon.

Toyota Announces Plan to Address Recalled Accelerator Pedals in Compliance with Lemon Law

After major recall events, Toyota promises customers a fix for accelerator pedal safety issues.

Online PR News – 03-February-2010 – Pittsburg, PA — Toyota announces they will begin fixing accelerator pedal safety issues this week after the voluntary recall of 2.3 million vehicles. The proposed solution reinforces the pedal assembly to reduce friction that Toyota says may cause the pedal to stick. Toyota has indicated that they will ship parts to dealers and begin dealer training immediately.

“We have developed a comprehensive plan to fix the sticking pedal situation in recalled Toyota vehicles,” said Jim Lentz, President of Toyota Motor Sales, USA. “We know what’s causing the sticking accelerator pedals…We also know it is most important to fix this problem in the cars on the road.”

Toyota promises customers that dealers will be open extended hours to handle the repairs. Owners of recalled vehicles can expect notifications explaining how to contact dealers for servicing. Toyota and Pontiac vehicles included in the recall are 2009-2010 RAV4, 2009-2010 Corolla, 2009-2010 Matrix, 2005-2010 Avalon, 2007-2010 Camry, 2010 Highlander, 2007-2010 Tundra, 2008-2010 Sequoia, 2009-2010 Vibe. Camry, RAV 4, Corolla and Highlander vehicles with VINs that begin with ‘J’ are not affected.

Owners who have concerns about their vehicle or its repair should keep documentation of repair orders, dealer conversations and any technical service bulletins. It is important to keep records of repair work including dates and times of all dealer or technician conversations and the time the vehicle was out of service.

The National Highway Safety Administration advises owners to pay attention how their accelerator pedals are working. If the accelerator becomes harder to depress or slower to return than normal, it may be a precursor to a safety issue. The NTSA says, “These vehicles should be parked and a dealer immediately notified. Should a pedal become stuck in a partially depressed condition while driving, owners should put their car in neutral, bring it to a stop and call their dealer.”

Owners who have experienced injury or loss of use of their vehicle from a sticking accelerator pedal should contact a lemon law professional in their state to see what remedies are available. Lemon laws exist to help resolve disputes between customers and manufacturers in the repair of defects in new motor vehicles.

“Every owner of one of the Toyota vehicles covered by the recall should make an appointment to get their accelerator pedal reinforced as soon as possible. Anyone who has experienced injury or loss of use of a vehicle due to a sticking accelerator pedal safety defect should contact a qualified attorney who is experienced handling lemon law cases to determine if additional remedies are available,” recommends lemon law attorney David Gorberg. “Lemon laws vary greatly. New Jersey Lemon Law stipulates that just a single incident involving driving safety can qualify a consumer for compensation, while other state laws, like Pennsylvania’s lemon law, may allow a dealer up to 3 attempts before a consumer is entitled to additional compensation.”

The Lemon Law Attorneys at David J. Gorberg & Associates have arbitrated, settled and litigated thousands of lemon law claims throughout New Jersey and Pennsylvania, recovering millions of dollars for their clients. Find more information at www.mylemon.com or call 1-800-MyLemon.

1-800-MY-LEMON’s Top 10 Recalls of All Time Cited In Toyota Lemon Law Story

A few years ago, 1-800-MY-LEMON, The Lemon Law Attorneys, informed the public about The Top 10 Largest Automotive Recalls of All Time. We are proud to announce that our Top 10 recall list was recently cited by John DeCostanza in his news story, titled, “Toyota’s Recall Not The Biggest and Will Not Be The Last“. A big thank you from our lemon law firm to Mr. DeCostanza for including us in his very important, and timely news story about Toyota’s sudden acceleration recall.